With Unimpressive Buttler out, India Need New Recipe for Success at Oval


Fresh challenge for bowlers: Jos Buttler, the England wicketkeeper who hasn’t quite found top form with the bat is due to miss the fourth Test because of the birth of his second child. Jonny Bairstow is expected to keep wickets for England, clearing the way for a more in-form batsman. That brings another challenge to India’s bowlers, who had more or less got the measure of Buttler.

Little weight in Kohli’s words: Virat Kohli has drawn much satisfaction over widespread misgivings about the out-of-form Indian team. Fighting back from defeat, he says, “is the situation we love best.” That spirit ought to inspire confidence among Indian fans. Except that such gung-ho talk from Kohli hasn’t been matched by his game, or indeed any other batsman’s. Indian fans are praying more than hoping.

The other side of the coin: Whatever anyone’s views on Kohli, and of late there have come to be two views on him, no one can dispute that he’s notoriously unlucky with the toss. This does lead to questions on who should want to bat first. England went against conventional wisdom at Lord’s and paid for it. For the Oval Test, the first three days look bright and clear, with rain on the fourth and fifth, if the match doesn’t end in three days that is. No doubt enough pundits will tell us what anyone should therefore do.

Scottish firm eyes India’s healthcare market: A number of British companies are looking to take new medical technologies to India. Among these is the small Scottish firm Sanollo headed by James Hardik from Edinburgh who has previously worked with selling medical technology out of Dubai. This company’s moves are typical of a strong recent push by British companies to equip private healthcare hospitals now competing to offer patients hi-tech healthcare. Given the growth in this business in India, the business is worth potentially billions to foreign companies.

Britain set to sizzle till November: Britain is preparing for an Indian summer to follow what has been something of an Indian monsoon. After a long wet spell in July and August, the English summer months, 27-degree temperatures have been predicted for September. By English standards, those would be “scorching” temperatures more or less officially described as an Indian Summer. It’s expected to be warm right up to November. After the wet spell, no one is in a mood to complain of global warming.

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here



Source link